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online release starts April 30

in Northwest Film Forum's virtual cinema
 

About

Phoebe (Marie Lazzaro) is just starting to find her passion as a competitive cyclist when her estranged father Ben (Lawrason Driscoll, M*A*S*H) comes back into her life.  As her brother makes efforts to patch things up, Phoebe tries to find answers about their mother, an artist who left when Phoebe was a child.  In doing so, she opens a vein of loss that’s divided the family. Phoebe sets her sights on racing, pushing herself harder and faster; but the old evasions won’t work anymore, and Phoebe has to face her past head on. 

Director John Helde and an award-winning cast worked together to improvise the story for this touching and bittersweet family portrait set in Seattle.

a Try This Films production
a John Helde film

Marie Lazzaro
Lawrason Driscoll
Eric Jordan 
Betty Campbell
Lisa Every
Jenn Ruzumna
Ryan Sanders

costume designer: Ron Leamon

original music by: Phillip Peterson

music by: Gretchen Yanover

edited by: Jo Ardinger

production designer: Tania Kupczak

director of photography: Lars Larson

produced by: Lisa Glaze, John Helde

screenplay by: John Helde

story by: John Helde, Marie Lazzaro, Lawrason Driscoll, Eric Jordan, Betty Campbell

directed by: John Helde

Press

"The struggles of this family are familiar and relatable... 
I had no clue that the story had an improvisation background—a testament to the process the cast and crew went through. The dialogue is tight and well-crafted. It trims the fat often associated with improvised dialogue and,
in turn, gives us authenticity."

- Alan Ng, Film Threat

read full review @ filmthreat.com

"I truly loved this movie... Phoebe, Ben, and Whit make up a dysfunctional family that is trying to put itself back together when no one really knows what they need from each other."

- Chris Burlingame, The Sunbreak

read full review @ thesunbreak.com

"PHOEBE'S FATHER shifts gears smoothly from grief to hope, pathos to humor in a tale of family and forgiveness. It moves at a swift clip due to its honesty and the strength of its performances that feel as real as any observational doc. John Helde’s feature will feel familiar and, in turn, be cherished by anyone who has suffered loss and struggled with acceptance."

- Warren Etheredge, The Warren Report